A Deadly Embrace

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Without a doubt this is the most impressive example of a Bittersweet Vine that I have ever seen and right here in New Ipswich.

A Fatal Embrace by John Poltrack on 500px.com
A mass of vegetation

 

A Fatal Embrace by John Poltrack on 500px.com
The Tree didn’t stand a chance

 

A Fatal Embrace by John Poltrack on 500px.com
Interwoven

 

A Fatal Embrace by John Poltrack on 500px.com
The vine killed the tree and fungi is cleaning up the body

 

 

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Witt Road

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In 2012, the U.S. Forest Service reported that in the nation’s Lower 48 states that New Hampshire leads the nation in percent tree cover.

“Tree cover in the nation’s Lower 48 states covers 659 million acres, more than one-third of the nation, according to a U.S. Forest Service study of national tree cover and impervious surfaces. New Hampshire leads the nation in percent tree cover (89 percent), followed by Maine (83 percent) and Vermont (82 percent). On the other end of the spectrum, North Dakota has the lowest percent tree cover (3 percent), followed by Nebraska (4 percent) and South Dakota (6 percent).”

It is ironic that with so many trees it is difficult to find lone trees that can photographed against an uncluttered background. One notable exception is a tree located on the Sawyer Farm. This location is also a great vantage point for watching sunsets near Mount Monadnock.

Tree of Witt Road by John Poltrack on 500px.com

 

Tree of Witt Road by John Poltrack on 500px.com

I’m not alone in my love of this locale,  Anne Miller Rockwell, a local photographer has some photos in her portfolio

Wildlife Pond

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Good morning,

Another view of the wildlife pond at Beaver Brook Association in Hollis, NH.

Wildlife Pond by John Poltrack on 500px.com
Beaver Brook Association is comprised of 2,187 acres of forest, fields, and wetlands in Hollis, Brookline, and Milford, New Hampshire. The land lies where the southern transitional forest meets the northern hardwood forest, creating a diverse landscape of interest to the naturalist and the hiker alike. With 35 miles of trails, the area provides a quiet and contemplative setting for daytime excursions. Forest and wildlife management is practiced throughout the property for the purposes of demonstrating sustainable forestry practices and wildlife habitat techniques to protect and encourage a diverse array of native species. BBA also protects significant portions of two watersheds and has designated natural areas that will be left unmanaged in perpetuity. We encourage the public to visit our forest, which is open from dawn to dusk seven days a week, and rediscover the natural world.

 

Three Views of Cape Cod

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Good morning, it is a chilly 17 degrees but the snow stopped in time for our first in the nation presidential primary.  I was lucky enough to see a few of the candidates in town meetings and rallies.

Today’s post features three ecosystems in Cape Cod.

Cliff Pond by John Poltrack on 500px.com
Tree by Cliff Pond at Nickerson State Park

 

Mass Audubon
Mass Audubon Sanctuary in Wellfleet, MA

 

5 AM by John Poltrack on 500px.com
Morning at Coast Guard Beach

 

Is the sap running yet?

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Good Morning, we have a bit of snow today which seems almost quaint after the mild winter we have been having.

I picked up a half gallon of maple syrup from Somero Maple Farm here in New Ipswich. It is quiet in the evaporator room, but soon they will be in full operation. The conditions have to be just right for the sap to start flowing. The temperature has to be above freezing during the day and below freezing at night. Just a few more weeks to go.

Sap Collection by John Poltrack on 500px.com
I gave this a try in February of 2010. A fun project.

 

End of the Season by John Poltrack on 500px.com
By April the sap gathering stops and all the equipment is cleaned and stored for next year

 

The Big-tooth Aspen in New Ipswich is no longer a contender for the Big Tree program

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This tree is located at the junction of 103 Smithville Road and Fox Farm Road, My neighbor nominated it for the NH Big Tree Program. It’s circumference at 4.5 feet was 184 inches. However it was rotten and threaten the owner’s home and garage. It had already dropped a branch which knocked out our power for a few hours.

It’s been a landmark on our street for as long as I’ve lived for and it’s strange to see it gone.

dead tree
With a circumference of 184 inches, this big-toothed aspen was a contender for the NH Big Tree program. Sadly it was missing it’s middle.
dead tree
The tree was in decline for many years and recently it had dropped a branch knocking out power.
dead tree
Cracks in the tree showed that it would have split in two taking out the garage, part of the house and all the power lines. The photo doesn’t really show how big this thing is.

Jaffrey Hilltop

I’m always on the lookout for a lone tree that I can photograph against the sky. When I do find one, I often return and take subsequent photos as the seasons change.  I especially like this tree which is located at Silver Ranch in Jaffrey, NH. Usually the pasture is full of horses.

Springtime at the Orchard

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I like to visit our local orchards to see the trees before they leaf out to admire the pruning work. This photo was taken in April of 2011 at Washburn’s Windy Hill Orchard in nearby Greenville, NH.